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Two minutes of totality

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High level clouds begin to cover the face of the Sun as the end of the eclipse approaches at 2:44 p.m.
The classic “diamond ring” effect is visible along with several solar prominences/flares (to the right of the Sun) just as totality ends at 1:30 p.m.
The Sun becomes move visible as the Moon begins to move out of position during the eclipse at 2:18 p.m.
The early phase of the total solar eclipse begins as the Moon begins to pass in front of the Sun with several of clusters of sunspots visible at 12:14 p.m. on Aug. 21, in Hendersonville. All images were captured using a Celestron Advanced VX 8” SCT telescope and a Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR by Photojournalist and Astrophotographer Rick Murray.
The solar eclipse nears totality as the Moon is nearly occluding the Sun at 1:18 p.m.
The corona is clearly visible along with several solar prominences/flares (to the right of the Sun) during the 2 minutes 35 seconds of totality.
The classic “diamond ring” effect is visible along with several solar prominences/flares (to the right of the Sun) just as totality ends at 1:30 p.m.

Much of Middle Tennessee, including Hendersonville experienced a once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse on Aug. 21. The eclipse began at 11:58:52 a.m. when the edge of the Moon first began to pass in front of the Sun.

Totality began at 1:27:20 p.m. and lasted for 2 minutes 35 seconds in the Winston Hills subdivision of Hendersonville before ending at 1:29:55 p.m. The eclipse ended at 2:54:06 p.m.

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